Osaka Expo 25 Logo

 

The new logo for the 2025 Expo was designed by a team led by graphic designer Tamotsu Shimada, who borrowed elements of the 1970 Expo and re-imagined them as chain of DNA. The ambiguous form and all its many cells are breathing, moving and dancing. It’s a design that will surely breath life into the Expo.

Source: https://www.spoon-tamago.com/2020/08/25/osaka-expo-2025-logo/

2025年国際博覧会(大阪・関西万博)の運営主体「日本国際博覧会協会」は25日、アートディレクターのシマダタモツ氏(55)ら「TEAM INARI」の6人の作品を公式ロゴマークに選んだと発表した。「

Source: 大阪万博ロゴ決定 制作者「70年万博のDNA表現」

The Trinity Cube – Trevor Paglen

When the world’s first atomic weapon exploded in New Mexico in July 1945, the energy from the blast formed a new mineral called trinitite from the desert sand. For his 2015 Trinity Cube project, artist Trevor Paglen took irradiated glass gathered from the area around where the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster occurred in 2011 and combined it with trinitite to form a blue cube. He then installed the cube in the Fukushima Exclusion Zone to continue to be irradiated.

The artwork will be viewable by the public when the Exclusion Zone opens again, anytime between 3 and 30,000 years from the present.

Source: The Trinity Cube

A New Line of Hanko Ink Inspired by the Colors of Nature | Spoon & Tamago

Times have been difficult for Japan’s hanko, a personal signature tool that dates back centuries. Technology has been rendering the system obsolete and a work-from-home environment triggered by the global pandemic has only accelerated this phase-out. But it’s a beautiful tradition. And in order to rethink the hanko’s place in modern society, stationery company Shachihata has released a new line of hanko ink, normally just red or black, in beautiful, lush colors inspired by nature.

The new line of hanko ink was actually born from a design contest that the stationery company hosted last year in order to solicit ideas from the public. Designer Satoru Utashiro sent in his idea for a new line of hanko ink called watashi no iro, or “my colors,” which ended up winning first prize. In fact, the company was impressed enough to commercialize the product, which just went on sale July 1.

Watashi no iro comes in 5 different colors, each inspired by a type of nature that is very familiar to Japan: ocean, citrus, nishikigoi (or koi fish), forest and camelia flowers.

Source: A New Line of Hanko Ink Inspired by the Colors of Nature | Spoon & Tamago

Lawson private brand logo & packaging | nendo

for Lawson

While many Japanese convenience store chains develop and offer private brand products under a unified image, Lawson operates multiple brands according to product type and target customer base: MACHI Café for coffee, Uchi Café for sweets, and NATURAL LAWSON for healthy goods, as well as branded fried chicken and rice balls. Such a system provides customers the joy of selecting from among highly specialized and distinctive brands, as if the convenience store were a shopping mall, but it also impedes the ability to appeal the Lawson brand itself. And so a visual identity system came to be considered, one maintaining the traits of each brand while creating a sense of unity under Lawson.

First, the silhouette from Lawson’s main logo and its L were taken to develop a highly recognizable and serviceable private brand icon, the ‘ L-logo’. It was conceived that, by having the L-logo change into existing brands as if the latter were costumes, a connection could be tied elegantly to the Lawson brand without damaging its former, conventional image. Other private brand products were included in a regular assortment for everyday life and labeled ‘L basic’, taking on the L-logo without modification. Packages are unified—with milk, eggs, bread, and other such foods in beige, and tissues, soap, and household goods in gray—and designed with silhouette illustrations to indicate package contents. Product names are indicated in four languages—Japanese, English, Chinese, and Korean—to accommodate overseas visitors. To reduce visual clutter once products enter the customers’ living spaces, prices and product descriptions are written clearly on the store POP displays. Food products outside L basic are branded as ‘L marche’ and placed into 4 categories—frozen foods, snacks, fast foods, and others—with features of each category added to the L-logo. In pursuit of a soft look that also appeals to non-regular female customers, a cozy font and hand-drawn illustrations depicting package contents and ingredients in an easy to understand manner are patterned across packages, rather than favoring large product photography like those covering the old packaging. The designs of Lawson’s nearly 700 private brand products, sold in approximately 14,000 stores nationwide, were systematized in a project undertaken in the hopes of bringing a little joy and comfort to everyday life.

Source: Lawson private brand logo & packaging | nendo